Learn British accents and dialects - Cockney, RP, Northern, and more!

Dipublikasikan tanggal 29 Apr 2016
Did you know that there are over 30 different English accents in England alone? And that's not all. Would you believe there are over a hundred different English dialects accross the world? In this lesson, I will tell you about some common British accents you might hear. You'll hear examples of Cockney, RP, Estuary, Northern, Scottish, Welsh, and many more accents. Don't miss this opportunity to add some spice to your English pronunciation and comprehension! Take the quiz at www.engvid.com/learn-british-a...

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is about accents in the U.K. So, U.K. accents and also dialects. Okay, so what's the difference between an accent and a dialect? Right. Well, an accent, as you know, is to do with pronunciation, how you pronounce the word. Dialect is when you have a word that only people in a certain area of the country use; it's not a national word, it's a local word that maybe people from other parts of the country, they won't even know what it means, so that's dialect. Okay. So, let's just have a look through some of the accents that we have in the U.K.

The one that you're probably learning as you're learning to pronounce English words is RP. "RP" stands for "Received Pronunciation". It's a slightly strange term. "Received" where do you receive it from? Well, maybe you receive it from your teacher. This is how to say this word. It's a slightly strange expression, but RP, it's usually referred to by the initials. And it's the kind of accent you will hear if you're watching BBC Television programs or listening to BBC Radio. Not everybody on the BBC speaks with an RP accent. The news readers tend to be RP speakers, but not always. But the strange thing is that in this country, only a very small percentage of people do speak with this accent. Apparently, just 3%, but they tend to be people in positions of power, authority, responsibility. They probably earn a lot of money. They live in big houses. You know the idea. So, people like the Prime Minster, at the moment David Cameron, he went to a private school, he went to university, Oxford, so people who have been to Oxford and Cambridge Universities often speak in RP, even if they didn't speak in RP before they went to Oxford or Cambridge, they often change their accent while they are there because of the big influence of their surroundings and the people that they're meeting. So that's RP. It's a very clear accent. So, it's probably a good idea to either learn to speak English with an RP accent, or you may be learning with an American accent, a Canadian accent, all of those accents are very clear. Okay. And being clear is the most important thing.

Okay, so moving on. RP, as I should have said, is mostly in the south of the country; London and the south. So, also "Cockney" and "Estuary English" are in the south. Okay. So, Cockney is the local London accent, and it tends to spread further out to places like Kent, Essex, other places like that. Surrey. There's a newer version of Cockney called "Estuary English". If you think an estuary is connected to a river, so the River Thames which flows across the country, goes quite a long way west. So anyone living along the estuary, near the river can possibly have this accent as well.

So, just to give you some examples, then, of the Cockney accent, there are different features. So, one example is the "th" sound, as you know to make a "th" sound, some of you may find it difficult anyway, "the", when you put your tongue through your teeth, "the", but a Cockney person may not use the "the", they will use an "f" sound or a "v" sound instead, so the word "think", "I think", they would say would say instead of: "think", they would say it like that: "fink", "fink", and the top teeth are on the bottom lip, "think". And words like "with" that end with the "th", instead of "with", it will be "wiv", "wiv", "wiv". "Are you coming wiv me?" So that is one of the things that happens with the Cockney accent.

Words like "together" would be "togever". Okay? The number "three", t-h-r-e-e is often pronounced "free": "We have free people coming to dinner. Free people." So, there can be confusion there, because we have the word "free", which has a meaning in itself, "free", but if you actually mean "three", the number three, there can be some confusion. So don't get confused by "free people". -"Oh, they're free? They're free to come?" -"No, there are three of them. Three people who are free to come." Ah, okay.

Komentar

  • I could sit and listen to her for hours

  • Thank you.

  • Oh my gosh! I love you, and love the way you teach !!

  • What I really wanna know is does Scrooge McDuck use an authentic Scottish accent?

    • @Learn English with Gill 路 engVid Thank you very much, miss Gill! You are such a sweet person and what you are doing with your videos is awesome 馃檪

    • Hi - this cartoon character has been voiced by different actors over the years: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrooge_McDuck - I've just listened to a 1967 cartoon (Scrooge McDuck and Money) and the voiceover for that one is a bit of a mixture of Scottish and American :-)

  • Dear Teach, thanks a lot you are so beautiful!!!

  • Muito bom, parabens, Deus a aben莽oe, sempre

  • Yes, you're so right about the vowel shift (bath/path/grass/glass etc). Living in the US now (orig from England and learning the Southern/RP version) it feels very strange to try to use the US version, even though I do say it the 'local' way so that I can be understood more easily 馃ぃEven my own name (which is far from an unusual name) is not understood if I say it how I natively say it...it's somewhat frustrating but just one of those things!

  • I'm English and grew up around people who spoke like Gill! Teachers, relatives, workmates, people in everyday life. I've been living in the US for 17 years now and while I love the people and accents here, I have missed people like Gill being around in my life! Also, I just realised through Gill's explanation of all the British accents that many of these differences can surely be confusing to new English speakers!

  • I wish I could speak the exactly way you do. That's it what I call RP. you are the one who might have gone to Oxford. There was a discussion between my friend and I on what English accent was best between British and American. and, of course I was always knee on the British and my friend American. But, after watching you, he changed his mind. I am Belmiro, from Mozambique- Africa.

  • The 鈥淩eceived Pronunciation鈥 term suggests that you acquire or adopt the pronunciation. It is not your natural pronunciation.

  • Me, Brazilian, trying to change my american accent into british but having a Brazilian accent 馃懟

  • Excelent lesson!!!

  • Would Cockney speakers pronounce the word 'glass' as, 'gwass' ? Or would they pronounce the "L" sound?

    • Hi - if L is combined with another consonant, eg bl... fl... gl... sl..., then a Cockney speaker would pronounce the L :-)

  • I love British accent

  • Great Video!! Very British 馃嚞馃嚙馃嚞馃嚙

  • I am from Chile and I appreciate the excellent and didactic explanation of the teacher, I loved it, thank you very much

  • I love a British language I am not from British I am from Iraq I learned the most beautiful British language 馃挀

  • Thank you Gill for this wonderful tutorial on UK accent. I studied in Birmingham long time ago. Your video make me remember those days in B鈥檋am. Thank you 馃槉

  • I love it, you are like my grandma

  • Love u mam.

  • Thanks 馃檹 you have a beautiful voice and it's really nice to hear you!

  • Juste parfait ! Juste vrai

  • A force d'茅couter des faux accents on trouve ici difficile et pourtant c'est du r茅el

  • Pour prononcer TH, je dis srui pour three ou wiz pour with

  • Thank you very much !!! Enfin une personne, je pense, r茅ellement ANGLAISE avec un vrai accent anglais et une prononciation des plus justes. MERCI Beaucoup

  • Thanks it makes me to understand some difference accent which was not clear for me.

  • 闈㈢櫧銇忚嫳瑾炪伄鏂硅█銇媺寮枫伀銇倞銇俱仚馃thank-you

  • I can understand every word what she say, but when I see a movie I can鈥檛 understand enything, why ? 馃槪

  • Strange how East Anglia/Norfolk always gets missed. It is a very distinct accent.

  • You are so sweet, Gill馃グ

  • She Needs To Hear This: G:Gorgeuos I:Inteligent L:Lovely L:Lady

  • I had wanted but had not any opportunity to study at Oxford , I wish my nephew has a chance to study at Oxford.

  • "Och! He's falling into the Loch!" Hello Gill, your channel so excellent. Thanks a lot, Gill.

  • Nice

  • Hello

  • Good job keep up it.

  • Very adorable and very informative, thanks

  • Das muy bonito y muy bien tus clases 馃槏馃槏馃槏馃槏馃槏馃槏馃槉馃槉馃槉馃槉馃槉

  • Thank you so much! I moved to Oxford and then London while in my youth. Love the british culture and language.

  • I've been told numerous times that I have an excellent Cockney accent. I got it as a child while watching the old black and white Tarzan movies starring Johnnie Weismuller. There was a man in those movies who was supposedly from London (I think) by the name of Rollins and he had a thick Cockney accent. Add to that that my family immigrated from England in the late 1700s. Someone told me years ago that they adopted a little girl from China at the age of 9 months. When she was in high school she decided that she would like to learn her native language so she began studying it and she learned it amazingly fast. She was told that it is not unusual for a person born in one country but raised in another to be able to learn their native tongue quickly.

  • While in the Midlands, that lie North of London, they tend to pronounce words exactly the way they are written, like /kup/ for a cup or /lov/ for love, in Russia there is a similar group of accents in territories North of Moscow. That is, words will be pronounced 'letter-for-letter' there, even though in Moscow they have changed with time.

  • She is so cute and speaks so lovely. I can listen to her for hours. With love from Brazil 鉂わ笍

  • I like english thank you

  • I learned so much from your lecture .thank you for this video

  • Excellent, thank you!

  • I vividly remember Sir Jeffrey Boycott, a famous Englishman, who was known for his Midland pronounciation. The legendary cricketer with his hat on while bowling use to pronounce CALCUTTA as KALKUTA

  • You're great!!!

  • You are my great teacher I really miss you a lot god bless you see you soon inshallah

  • Ohh thats fine pronunciation of this lady british is perfect i remenber to my teacher of english in the high school i like this accents and dialects of differents types of words ...thanks nice lady british 馃挅馃尮馃嚨馃嚜馃馃帀鉁

  • I love you 鉂わ笍鉂わ笍..u r a good person

  • Really you are the perfect teacher for me thank's for your lesson

  • 鈾ワ笍

  • Just started watching but fairly sure the following thought will not need to be altered: it would be hilarious if Gill would identify the accent that Madonna picked up after living in the England for a short while. 馃槅

  • I'm really love her accent so much. But all the teachers teach in engVid is british?

    • No, actually they have teachers from different English speaking countries

  • 馃憤馃

  • Love you darling!

  • Absolutely love Gill, she truly is a treasure. I could listen and learn from her every day, and it would be a total pleasure! Amazing, engaging and interesting teaching, Gill is the best on ID-tv.

  • I love this lady, she is so sweet 馃グ

  • She is so cute, I'm British and speak mainly with an RP accent but I'm original from Staffordshire in the North Midlands but lived in London most of my life so just like her there are a few words that I still pronounce with a Midlands accent. I love accents and find them fascinating, hence why I'm watching this

  • You are such an inspiration Madam. You come across so real and very near.

  • RP is the best accent. I can鈥檛 understand what Alex Ferguson was saying in his press conference

  • CONGRATULATION.

  • Is Gill speaking with RP accent then?馃

  • This lady is very kind and a great professor. She explains everything in a very clear way. She's doing her job very well. Bravo for her !

  • I love your videos, keep the great work!

  • You are my favorite new teacher.

  • You look like queen

  • 丕賰賵 毓乇丕賯賷馃槀

  • Her way to explain is just wonderful. I think, I love her馃槈馃槈馃槈馃槈馃槈馃憤馃憤馃憤馃憤馃憤

  • Easily my favorite English teacher online!

  • Dear lady, you'e a terrific teacher ! 馃憤馃挭 In the meantime I do realize that English has such many and many facets ! It's not as easy as you might think 馃槺馃槻馃槃馃槀馃榿 Many thanks for sharing your vids.

  • Oh, I SO wanted you ''am I bovvered'' when talking ''cockney'' replacing the 'th' with 'v'. LOL.

  • you are best teacher of english and you are sweety. Like my grandmother 馃グ

  • when to use "not" and "no"?

  • Most Caribbean (Jamaica) return residents develop a cockney accent

  • Finally find right teacher ! 馃槝

  • I will leave you a comment from Iran. I am very happy to learn the beautiful British English from you..鉂も潳鉂も潳馃挮馃挮

  • I noticed that the pronunciation from midlands and North est Scotland sound perfectly same.

  • And Scottish accent I can learn from series Outlander

  • I live in Ukraine. A lot of our people definitely are cockney speakers. It's difficult for them to pronounce TH sound with tongue between teeth so they pronounce F

  • This lady is how I imagined Britain to be

  • I love watching your videos and I learnt alot

  • Thanks a lot.

  • I was fascinated by her teaching. Thank you.. from sri lanka..

  • Amy way I still like american english easy to understand

  • Nice lesson lovely teacher 馃憤

  • LOVE IT

  • It's like Iran you go four directions you get four accents and more if you keep going further

  • Thank you for this video 馃檹馃徎

  • Muy interesante !

  • 鉂ゐ煈

  • Thank you very much. You explain English grammar very nice.

  • Excellent! Now I can begin to understand UK English accents.

  • When she says that "dialect" is the same as "words" (understood as vocabulary/expressions) I wonder about other levels in the language. Is there not any differences in word order or in flection/shapes of words. In Swedish there is syntactical differences regionaly, and also provinsial differences in flection. But on the other hand Swedish got more of flection, and because of that a higher amount of flection morphemes.

  • I orginally thought my accent is a jumble of american and british accents, but now i realised its a jumble of different american accents mixed with a jumble of different british accents

  • I love both accent American English and The UK English. Keep it up ma'm. Thank you so much from Laos.

  • Thank you for the lesson ))))

  • I found this channel in 2021 and I hope she's good. She's very lovely.

  • Your 鈥渂ath鈥 still sounds very English to me鈥

  • 隆Gracias!