Why Haven't You Heard Of One Of History's Greatest Geniuses?

Dipublikasikan tanggal 10 Apr 2022
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Thoughty2 (Arran) is a British ID-tvr and gatekeeper of useless facts. Thoughty2 creates mind-blowing factual videos about science, tech, history, opinion and just about everything else.


Writing: Steven Rix
Editing: Jack Stevens

Komentar

  • As a university level mathematician myself, I have to emphasise just how insanely genius you need to be in order to not only understand high level pure maths but be making breakthroughs in the fields, all without any formal education or access to mathematical textbooks. Its almost more impressive than anyone else because he did everything solely based on his own brainpower.

    • @Praveen Vasistha yes my friend I have seen it now . I wrote that message many months ago lots of thoughtful people like yourself . Have told me about it so I found it and watched it . But I appreciate it thank you 👍👌

    • @Praveen Vasistha yes I can believe that the universe is God the more we learn about how the universe works the more we learn that there is intelligence connecting all things string theory is one of them I know it's not proven it just a theory . And quantum entanglement is also proving that the universe is alive sentient superintelligence if that is god I don't know what it is . My Friend

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • I am from South India and it is said that most of Ramanujan work is lost, He had a habbit of solving math problems on the floor of an old temple using chalk and wasnt recorded anywhere. He always said that a Goddess communicated the equations to him and was a very spiritual man.

  • I wonder if his lack of formal education in mathematics actually helped him make discoveries which were made down paths that formal education would steer you away from - as in he could see things in a different way to most other mathematicians that had been trained a certain way

    • On the contrary. He spent much of his youth deriving or rederiving identities about series, out of touch with modern developments in mathematics. If he had been discovered by the likes of Poincare or Hilbert 10 years before Hardy (who was hardly cutting-edge) brought him into the spotlight, he could have become one of the truly greats, on par with Riemann or Euler.

    • that's what I was also thinking, if his life was not the way it was I don think he would have been the genius that he is

    • @Shubham Garg ... I was responding to another person on "God" question. I don't doubt he credited his God or whatever. Religion is a touchy subject and I don't want to go into that. It would take all day and resolves nothing.

    • @A B idk, 500 years ago you had to be either rich or a priest to participate in scientific research. Academic institutions made that available for the masses. To get back to mathematics, you literally have all the information accumulated over the last 1000 years available for free online, so in theory you could skip academic institutions. Yet no scientific breakthrough in modern times has come from amateurs. Maybe you can elaborate on what kind of alternatives you have in mind, that will not also end up being some kind of academic institution. As for Ramanujan, he was an insane talent, and had he been discovered as a child and received formal academic training earlier, his achievements could have been on par with the likes of Euler.

  • The Mock Theta Functions which is used to explain Black Holes was proved 92 years after his death . Just goes to show how far ahead of his time he was .

    • @J What it takes is attention only nothing else to observe life and know it's vast magical phenomena, its just that we are just ignorant of our own nature but seeing geniuses like Ramanujan, sets an example that those boundaries of ignorance can be broken.

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • @thecsucihai That a Lot of Inventions. Heck, Electric Cars existed 100 years ago but gasoline was better at the time due to technology limitations.

    • It is like he created battery but had nothing to use it on...back in the drawer it goes. Let the next generation figure it out.

    • @J true, and there are a lot of mathematical tools used to study black holes, much of them developed long before Ramanujan and thousands of mathematicians contributed to them. If one had to single out one of them, it would have to be Riemann. The connection of Ramanujan to black holes is blown way out of proportion, but it fuels the imagination.

  • There is a large misconception regarding Ramanujan that he was not able to prove his own theorems, which is very far from truth ofcourse, he proved most of his own results and latter in his life when he was sick , he noted down only the final results in his notebook and did the proof work in his slate, for those who don't know what a slate is, it's a mini chalk board, with a mini chalk and a peace of cloth that works as a duster. Slates were really popular in India at that time and you can find them still today in rural parts of India, the reason he didn't note down the proofs but only the final results was because papers were really expensive at that time and so as to note down the most of his work in as little space as possible, he only noted down the final results in his paper notebook and did the proofs in his slate.

    • Also paper was very expensive those days that's why he used chalk board

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • @Sham Mohan Sood Mate those are disputed territories. May be u didn't know these are places were the line of control runs along. And the MEA of Gov. of India acknowledges & asks the pakistanis to respects this very line of control. The larger image we see of Kashmir is just propaganda by our government. U can even refer to military maps from USA, UK etc they all show the same map that was shown in this video.

    • @Richard Swaby calm down, one day the England would be shown the same.

    • @Kabir Soni one of the beautiful things life has to offer is the wisdom to inform people in 2022 of faulty maps of India. Correct the map lol

  • Hearing Ramanujan's story one has to wonder/ask themselves imagine all the untapped, uneducated kids around the poor and rough corners of this world and how many Ramanujan's might be hiding amongst them. Truly scary, sad, and impressive to think about.

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • “I am, somehow, less interested in the weight and convolutions of Einstein’s brain than in the near certainty that people of equal talent have lived and died in cotton fields and sweatshops.”

    • I just hope the next Ramanujan gets the opportunity Ramanujan missed.

  • Ramanujan's story is hand down one of the greatest such a profound genius it's quite remarkable what he did with little to no formal education

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • Where are you from?..

    • @e_jskeg LOL I UNDERSTAND WHAT U TRYIN TO SAY and yes the terrorist-attack in jammu kashmir has stop a lot after the MODI govt came in power in 2014 and now its gone up due some reason and now india has invited G20 country to come to india and now it is gonna be in jammu kashmir next year maybe around this time only

  • Honestly, when I hear stories about geniuses, no matter what field, make me inspired. It's crazy that he could just reverse engineer what was in that text book in a way in order to understand it. It reminds me of Jimi Hendrix and how he did the same thing but just with guitar. Who knows how many geniuses are just lurking out in the world

    • I loved Jimmy, and saw him at the Newport Jazz festival; however, I feel that many mathematical discoveries have a sublime beauty beyond the senses. Moreover, our universe seems to operate, or to be modelled on mathematical structures/ objects. As a mathematical physicist, my favorite recreation is listening to great music while doing mathematics. Jimmy was certainly 'in tune' with the universe on multiple levels, as are many other artists.

  • Hardy was a man of culture too. Instead of stealing the fruits of labour like any other British people then he supported and guided him

    • @Sham Mohan Sood What do you expect us to do? Why doesnt your govt with central bureaucracy under its command can't control even simple youtube content? When they dont care, you should ask them to start caring, dont do drama.

    • @Netaji-The British Slayer 4:22 You do realize he's talking about the year 1887 right? He was supposed to show the British Raj map

    • @Aspiring Pilot bro have u heard of the term PARTITION ??

    • @shubham chaudhary then why not Pakistan and Bangladesh included?

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

  • It's almost as if the Universe didn't want him to uncover all it's secrets, so he was taken from us at such an early age. I only imagine what people like him can discover/invent if they had a longer lifespan.

  • It's so upsetting that he died as young as he did. His story makes me wonder how many other incredible talents might have been born in bad circumstances and never got to change the world like they would have if they got to study and live in a better way.

  • A point to note here is that there were many theorems that were already discovered by the mathematicians of that time. But Ramanujan didn't get them from anywhere rather he discovered them all on his own which many different mathematicians discovered over a period of time.

    • @John Wade What do you mean 'his background' !?!

    • @Praveen Vasistha yeah.. It's sad that it was the British that made such excellent movie on his life and not us Indians.

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • Yup

  • I watched a movie made in his honour, truly a remarkable man, he gradually gets his recognition nowadays unlike other unsung Mathematics geniuses.

  • There's this guy that didn't pay attention at class when He was a kid but he developed his own way to do basic math calculation, an orthodox way, when you understand something naturally in your own way it opens door to knew things, the fact he didn't get actual math education was key to let his genius brain to let things flow

  • What I love about this story more than anything was the fact that he done things in his own way so much so that he made it impossible for people to take credit for his work

  • Studying everything that came before teaches most people, including many geniuses, to think a certain way. Most formally educated people can't even imagine that thinking a certain way is a major obstacle to revolutionary change.

  • Ramanujan frequently said, "An equation for me has no meaning, unless it represents a thought of God."-and he wasn't kidding. Like ancient Indian mathematicians, Ramanujan only noted the results and summaries of his works; no proof was worked out for the formulae he came up with. He straightaway credited his work to the divine providence of Mahalakshmi of Namakkal, a family goddess whom he looked to for inspiration. The mathematician said that he dreamed of the Goddess' male consort Narasimha, who is denoted by droplets of blood, after which, scrolls of complex mathematical work unfolded in front of his eyes.

    • @Chirich kilipaari presents Non sense one can not digest a fact 🤣cry bro

    • Superstition can coexist with science e........but not for long

  • Imagine if he had lived a long life into old age. Technology could be hundreds of years ahead of where it is today.

  • Absolutely loved this video! I was aware of his story but not about his work continuing to be understood ❤️

  • Thanks for introducing me to this Super Genius. Ramanujan has to be one of the most amazing geniuses of all time. It's unfathomable what he had accomplished without any formal education in his field. It's so sad that his life was cut short at 32, before he could have reached his full potential. Just imagine how much further in Math & Science we could have been had he lived a full life.

  • “An equation has no meaning unless it represents a thought of God.” I doubt his abilities come from his lack of education nor was he hindered by that because as we see he only became better as he gained access to more education. Education or not, there was something he was doing or something he understood from the beginning that caused his results. I don’t know what thought of God means exactly but it may be a clue to explain why the math concepts were seemingly obvious to him while out of reach for others. It’s possible his goal was never to solve any equation-as he says they’re meaningless. Rather his goal was to satisfy the conditions of whatever representing a thought of God means. Maybe that’s why it seems so simple for him. He only ever had one problem to solve. In any case, I hope he found his solution. R.I.P.

    • A lot of geniuses say that whatever they produced felt like it was coming from God, just with them being the mediators. Bach said that about his music, and many others. Now, does it really come from God? I don't know, but there definitely is something that enabled them to access their subconscious or even the collective unconscious in some way, that let them tap into stuff no one gets access to

  • I think you described his fantastic genius the right way: missing formal education he studied the thousands of formulas until they talked to him. His brain created a language for him and only him!

    • @Benjamin Adler hahaha💯💯💯

    • @Nirmal Singh Of course, most single-minded people are not geniuses. If you spend your teenage years playing football, you MIGHT become a professional player for a few years, and then work as a coach or sports teacher, but more likely you will just be a good amateur player with a poor education.

    • @Faithless Hound "If we insist every child must have a broad, general, education we block the single-minded geniuses. " this is the truth...

    • ... being tutled by a Hindu Goddess doesn't hurt either: Ramanujan openly stated that he received the mathematical inspiration and sometimes whole formulas, through contacting the Hindu Goddess Namagiri while dreaming.

    • Or, you know, the French teacher could have suggested the kids get jobs in just about any large company that has any dealings with Francophone countries, or that they become translators or tour guides- or that they could combine the French in a joint degree with just about anything, like physics, engineering, business etc, which would allow them to work in all sorts of organisations, but have a choice of countries where they would do any kind of postgraduate or research work, or just live and work. Somewhere like the French Mediterranean coast, or French speaking areas of Canada, or North Africa…

  • When I was younger my family had a gardener who later started cleaning the house as well, when we first met him he spoke 2 languages neither of which was english. In the 3 years he worked for us he was able to communicate very well with us and he learnt it through hearing my siblings and i speak and this was without any formal education and no exposure to english outside of our house on top of that he was about 30 years old, every now and again i think of what he could have become had he been given an opportunity to learn. stories like this make me happy and sad because its amazing to know that people like this exist but so sad when you realise so many of them will never come to prominence because of the state of our world

  • As someone who always enjoys videos about Ramanujam, it's kind of fun to think about how much must have been going on in his head for him to arrive at so many things so rapidly and so naturally that it would just flow. Also, I'd throw in a little additional aside -- his name on his birth certificate is actually spelled "Ramanujam" with an "m". The spelling with an "n" at the end is actually an error on his VISA paperwork that enabled him to enter England, though it is technically a perfectly valid spelling of the name. And also, because that was on his VISA, his legal name within the UK is actually "Ramanujan." My mother kept a photo of his birth certificate (taken at the museum dedicated to him) before she passed as we were from the same family (and her maiden name was also "Ramanujam"). IIRC, the blood connection is that my maternal grandfather was the son of one of his 2nd cousins or something like that. There's also a slightly more distant, but one generation less, connection on my father's side, but I'm not really sure what it is, tbh. Anyway, getting back to what I was referring to about what might have been in his head to result in that "magic trick" that Dyson mentioned. I have had numerous moments in my career where I bust out a solution to a complex mathematical or logical/algorithmic problem in a matter of minutes when others take days or weeks getting nowhere. From the outside, it might seem like something mystical. From my own perspective, though, this sort of event falls in two categories -- either I'd recently been working on something similar or closely related recently, meaning it was not a huge cognitive leap to solve that new similar problem, or alternatively, it's actually something I'd run across many times in the past, so it was again something I'd have existing insight on from past experience. It was never "I did that super fast..."; It was always "I did something like that some time ago, and I drew from that." In the same vein, I can kind of picture someone as obsessive as Ramanujam having run through so much in his head, having always been thinking about such a variety of problems that there may well have been so much of this built-up experience and the relationships between them that might have been really tenuous on paper would have just become second nature for him. I am not sure whether that was actually how it was for him or he just had something else going on -- the collection of anecdotes about him give me mixed signals to that effect. Even if that is how it worked, it still means he had to have a massive volume of body of knowledge and a sensibility for it that I don't think has been duplicated by anyone before or since.

  • I've read a little and seen a video or 2 about Ramanujan, but I hadn't realized how truly brilliant and accomplished he was and that he had dabbled in G.H. Hardy's area of speciality and stumped Hardy himself. Also that he had used the preparation book for the graduate program entrance exam in mathematics at Trinity college that had no explanatory material, just page after page of complicated equations that would be like trying to read Chinese for someone with no familiarity with the characters. That he had the patience to crack the meaning of all these equations and understand their derivation and purpose...Wow! I don't think they make people like Ramanujan anymore.

  • My father was a mathematician who died in the 1980s, and he very much admired Ramanujan. That's probably why I guessed you were going to talk about Ramanujan (and Hardy) even before you mentioned Hardy's name -- and of course as soon as you mentioned Hardy, I knew that I was right.

  • Hardy was a genius himself. One of the greatest of his generation. He helped Ramanujan throughout the years with great success. Their joint works are incredible. But even he himself admitted that there is a high possibility that Ramanujan could have become the greatest mathematician of his generation, and that his achievements during his short life already qualified him as one of the greatest. He also said that when all his works will be finally analyzed, his true genius will seem even greater than they did that day. He was right.

    • @EyeOfBraille India was always kind of a democratic place. It’s why their democracy didn’t collapse like in so many other places. Indian culture always values different ideas and perspectives. Indians would have had the government that they wanted. They don’t need some foreigner justifying stealing all of their wealth and causing millions of deaths and then claiming they gave democracy. Indians could have been wealthier and they would have decided on what they wanted. Britain and Other countries didn’t need to be colonized by america for democracy lmao. It’s more nuanced than that. The powers have to bend to the people. The people choose what they want at the end of the day. In china the people prefer their own brand of authoritarianism and have preferred it for a thousand years. That’s fine it’s their democratic choice to have that. It’s working financially for them. Americans on average are much unhappier with their government than the Chinese are. In general it comes across racist that you believe Indians wouldn’t have adopted a government that they wanted. They always did that and they literally did it when the British left. Indias old empire had scattered into tinder pieces but they all reunited and agreed on the current constitution. They did this in a time where they were more economically backward than before colonialism yet you think Indians couldn’t have done that lmao. You make it sound like they didn’t learn to breath until they saw a British person. Right now india is the fastest growing major economy in the world despite everything. India passed a 1.4 trillion dollar infrastructure bill while America struggles to barely agree that infrastructure is important. If Japan was colonized and in a worse state than the Philippines you people would claim it was good what happened since you built them railroads to take their wealth from them and accepted a smart Japanese boy who basically only didn’t get a chance in life because his country was literally being destroyed by the same country that’s claiming to be helping him!

    • 'Hardy was a genius himself. One of the greatest of his generation. He helped Ramanujan throughout the years with great success.' Oh what a white man favour to an Indian Genius 🙄..Pity

  • Very good video. Ramanujan's mathematical intuition is the key and it is believed he got to know of various patterns from the Goddess Herself. His natural links to his temple culture (which was replete with complex Geometrical diagrams, prayers consisting of sacred syllables, Sanskrit language, mantras and scriptural patterns) besides his innate association with Mathematics possibly played roles to make him the odd one-off genius that he turned out to be. The ancient Indian culture shows that spirituality and science are not two separate entities but are in fact, intertwined. That is precisely why for most of us- as you yourself interestingly remarked- his equations, formulae, etc seemed so otherworldly and incomprehensible at first. Thank you for making this video, emphasizing his place in Science and Maths History. You are correct. Amongst other human mathematicians, Ramanujan has officially no precedence. He was unique in that regard. As an Indian, I am happy to see this but if I may just point out- please do not show a map of India without Her Head (with Kashmir cut-off). Kashmir is an integral part of India.

  • Amazing video. Thanks for creating this. I learned a lot!

  • Amazing story, but I was under the impression everyone knew about him lol. They even made a film about him called “The Man Who Knew Infinity”, and they reference his story in Good Will Hunting

  • So how is he "one of the greatest mathematicians ever"? Obviously he had no equal or near equal. He was too far ahead for his first works to be understood even today. They are still figuring it out. It is just outrageous to not call him what he was and still is, the greatest mathematician of all time, so far.

    • I agree. Ramanujan had the greatest intuition for mathematics of any person in history. Euler was the most proficient though, and produced the most results. Both are impressive and almost supernatural

  • "he may not of started out on top of humanities wall of knowledge, but that didn't matter S R just built his own". Beautifully put Thoughty2 beautifully put.

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • @Doug Anderson good point

    • Maybe his ideas were only possible without the wall of knowledge. If he had been educated in them they might have negated the development of his thought patterns they way they came to be.

  • There's a movie called The Man Who Knew Infinity, it's based on Ramanujan's life. Worth a watch and it amazingly depicts how exactly his knowledge was conceived. Great video!

  • I believe there are several films about this genius man, but the one I recall immediately after starting this video is The Man Who Knew Infinity. How accurate it is, I can't recall. But it was beautifully made.

  • What an incredible story. Thankyou for highlighting this man's life. I've had the pleasure to visit and explore Channai/Madras, a place rich in history. This tale will always add to that. 👏

  • Imagine if he would have lived longer for another decade or tow. He would have advanced the mathematical field so much

  • The fact that Ramanujan's mathematics are being applied to an understanding of Black Holes and that he died a mere four years after the conception of black holes, simply put, blows my mind. His genius was incomprehensible, maybe even divine in nature.

    • @zerpy There's no proof it actually came from that Indian Goddess.

    • He did say that his knowledge was given to him by an Indian goddess while he slept. I'm from the same town Ramanujam hailed from.

    • @Praveen Vasistha He didn't know infinity no one can know infinity except maybe me and god but if you ask me what infinity is I wont answer it will spoil the surprise and I am a kind lord

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • @bowXfire because physics

  • Ramanujan frequently said, "An equation for me has no meaning, unless it represents a thought of God."-and he wasn't kidding. Like ancient Indian mathematicians, Ramanujan only noted the results and summaries of his works; no proof was worked out for the formulae he came up with. He straightaway credited his work to the divine providence of Mahalakshmi of Namakkal, a family goddess whom he looked to for inspiration. The mathematician said that he dreamed of the Goddess' male consort Narasimha, who is denoted by droplets of blood, after which, scrolls of complex mathematical work unfolded in front of his eyes.

  • When it comes to self taught geniuses in india.. there were some others too but they didn't get recognition like him.. my grandfather told me about indian people how they mastered their work by self learning.. even my grandfather himself had a life where he was just a poor kid then luckily got a book lying in the dump. which was unusual at that time.. that was a book of ancient indian methodology about chemicals and medicine.. later he become a vaidya/doctor... What's interesting is that he told me that after getting the book he used to get dreams where he learned the knowledge.. like a portal to endless knowledge.. he also describes that he also used to see a guru in dreams who helped him.. unfortunately he is no more in this world and i never got to ask him more than this.. that book also changed hands due to carelessness and as it was hard to decipher.. i had an intuition that it was one of india National treasure.. one of the 9 lost books of ashoka..

  • Using that wall theory: If all other great mathematicians placed a brick or two on top of the previous generations, Ramanujan placed a dozen bricks floating well above the wall that we are still building to meet. Love your videos, by the way!

  • Hardy put him in class of Euclid and Jacobi so it's beyond our comprehension how good he was, as an Indian , i can say, only this man is reason why I am proud of my country , he is greatest Indian ever period

  • I studied this man in high school (I'm 40 now). I taught myself algebra, calculus, matrix analysis, quantum mechanics and elementary particle physics, but the moment I started studying this man's work, I was completely stumped. I had no idea what I was looking at. Ramanujan was centuries ahead of his time.

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • @Jon Yep. The most interesting part of quantum mechanics to me is the two approaches for predicting probability outcomes. Under the Schrodingher approach there is no trajectory while the Feynman approach has you assessing every trajectory. Interesting thing is, both come to the same conclusion

    • You have the mental capacity to not only understand quantum mechanics but do so without instruction, yet you worked in a factory for the majority of your career? Good one!

    • @B of course it doesn't mean that everybody is, but if most people are, then it's likelier that he is also bullshit than it is that he's telling the truth. That's just raw probability. As for who cares for a stranger's opinion, all I can do is point towards the guy I was replying to, lol. I honestly didn't think he'd end up caring enough to even reply, but as we saw, he sure did

  • Also, Ramanujan figured out the trigonometric equations by himself when he was a kid. That's his genius. .

  • Ramanuja used to say that he sees all these equations in dreams & his family goddess used to explain those to him. That simply means that there are some other dimensions out there who are constantly helping humans to develop new stuff.

  • 17:00 Makes one think about how many times people independently discovered concepts throughout history or even prehistory, only for them to be lost or forgotten instead of being built upon.

  • What a great video Buddy...... thanks for highlighting interesting details about our Hero, have become a fan of Thoughty2 instantly.

    • But he displayed wrong map of India

  • Schools tend to teach us how to do something "the right way", even when the "right way" is just one way to solve things. S.R managed to see math from his own perspective, and that's the magic trick we will never understand.

    • @Jack of course you need to show your proof.

    • @Play Doh most of the time, the correct method is the most flexible and foolproof one. I can see why your are mad, but if you are reprimanded for that when solving a question, remember this.

    • @Shahid Karim but it would be nice if the world helped.

    • Once an interviewer asked to gh hardy how would u rate urself,einstien,ramanujan out of 100,this is the real answer hardy gave,i will give myself 37/100,einstien 66/100 nd ramanujan 97/100. Ramanujan's than written theories r helping scientists now in the study of black holes,ramanujan said godess saraswasti comes in my dreams nd gives me all these equations,nd infact many scientists hav speculated there is a dimension greater than ours where all the mystries of universe r answered,its often called as akashic records(akash in hindi means sky),if we consider einstein as principal of best school of knowledge in the world thn ramanujan would be the head of the board of education of the world,we indians were never good at marketing our things,thts y evrything got stolen from here by westrn countries nd sold by labeling there names,from surgery to invention of 0,from shampos to agriculture to drainage systms nd what not,we indians had knowledge of the motions of planets nd stars 1000s of years before any westrn scientists,nd there r proofs of this in our culture,traditions,engravings on our temples,the invention of atom bomb was inspired from geeta,hindus holy book,there is an interview by eisenhower giving credit of his invention to our geeta,mark zuckerburg,steve jobs came to a temple in the north of india during there worst days,nd followed the path tht poojari(priest)suggested thm,just search gadhchiroli baba nd steve jobs or zuckerberg story,u will undrstand,we r the worlds oldest surviving civilization,we know alot of things tht world dont,from past 1200 years we were ruled by some shitty people who just looted our country,1st there were mughals,thy broke our temples,killed our people,converted thm to islam,thn britishers came,india financed ww1 nd ww2 for the britishers,if u want to know more about tht,just search shashi tharoor oxford speech on what britishers took from india,but now finally we got a leader like modiji,who is not only motivating us but also reminding us of glories nd achivmnts of hinduism in the past,thts y now a days u see all this things about india is coming out nd everybody is surprised by this,india is not developing,it is reglcapturing what had been looted from us in the name of secularism.

  • Great presentation! Thanks for putting this bio of Ramanujan together. I would term your work to be "Masterworks" In a different way, of course, Ramanujan's maths reflects MASTERWORKS. Cheers.

  • Well, all I can speak is that I am proud of being from the same land as him... . He was a genius, never seen before; probably difficult to in future.

  • I feel proud Sir,being an Indian I feel proud of our Mathematician Ramanujan Sir..Thank you for discussing him today🙏🙏

  • I had literally cried when I watched 'the man who knew infinity' both Dev Patel as Ramanujan and Jeremy Irons(all time favorite) as Hardy mastered the role..

  • People nowadays used the word "Genius" to lightly, and we lost a way to describe in simple term how to address people like Ramanujan. Outlier like him is so far and few among billions of people, not every smart or bright person, should get call genius, "Hard working" maybe, "talented" sure, but when you hear stories of people like Ramanujan and their impact to the betterment of science and humanity in general, that is the time to use the term "Genius".

    • :)

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

    • Exactly. I agree 💯💯💯

    • Nowadays all you gotta do if you wanna meet a genius is just walk down to your nearest apple store. There'll be at least 10 of em there

  • Excellent video. My most respect to all mathematicians. Have an amazing day.

  • Very informative video showcasing the genius of an Indian mathematician. But why on Earth is the Indian map not showing Kashmir? Would you have published a British map without Northern Ireland or Scotland as well?

  • Ramanujan Sir was a great mathematician so much ahead of his time with him complex mathematical equations 👍 I just have an issue as an Indian myself, my country's map that you've used is disrespectful ☹️

  • Great work at the research and the video. Really appreciate it. Just one suggestion I would request, please do not depict the false map of India ever again if possible. For Indians, it looses all the respect for the art and say you have after that. I strongly believe that even our Sir Ramanujan would also have accepted the thought. Thank you. No hard feelings! Good luck.

  • i love your content because they are so vivid and fantastically explained

  • Mate, you are such a wonderful story teller!!!!

  • Thank you for this wonderful story of this brilliant man.

  • It seems to me that he may have had access to a portion of what some cultures call the "Akashic Records". I'll let anyone who is curious as to what that is find their own rabbit hole to explore. Have fun!

  • I salute you for your contributions sir i know he’s looking down at us and smiling for Mankind ❤️

  • Had he received a proper education, he would've been a regular genius researcher and certainly not this unique.

  • This is perhaps one of the best arguments for equal access.

  • Wonderful Vid man. It really is heartwarming to see the potential of the human mind at work.

  • Just a comment: The photograph at 12:17 is not of Srinivasa Ramanujan. It is another famous living Indian mathematician, S. R. S. Varadhan, a winner of the Abel Prize, and currently a faculty at the Courant Institute, NYU.

    • ​@Satish RM It is the Hindi name for India. How is it that you do not know that?

    • @Dipak Kumar then why he didn't included bangladesh and pakistan in india.

    • He also didn't show kashmir in indian map

    • @ssmash i think south indians should know what bharat means more

  • He was not exceptional- he was a hyper genius- he could dream new formulas into existence, but his life was a tragedy

  • Ramanujan was the rarest sort of genius. His life was a preious gift and his death was a preventable tragedy.

  • And now imagine somebody who has the intuitive understanding of Ramanujan, the deep thinking of Einstein and the processing speed of von Neumann all in one person. This person was Carl Friedrich Gauss. When his unpublished notes were discovered long after his death they estimated he wound have moved mathematics decades ahead. But he was not a pleasant personality 😀

  • The vast majority of us need a learned sequence just to add or subtract. When I was first introduced to Calculus, it took me awhile to understand it. What this gentleman did, needs a new word. Not genius. Maybe SuperGenius.

  • Perhaps one less appreciated aspect of Ramanujan’s ascent, or realisation of his capabilities, is the spare time he found to devote to his itch. He was not a Maths degree holder; he was a clerk at a port authority. People forget; he did math in his spare time, for fun; as a release. Maybe one takeaway from Ramanujan’s story is the importance of hobbies and free, unrestricted thinking, in any field really. They say the first logarithmic tables too were an outcome of a quirky hobby.

    • Einstein was working at a patent office while he was following his passion. Well said.

    • I have a tendency to fantasise about beautiful women in my spare time. I am not going to lie, I thoroughly enjoy thinking about naked matured women (preferably 40-50).

    • Totally agree. That's why it's important for parents to encourage not force children into hobbies.

    • @NeilYouKnow Ta mate.

  • When you learn things your own way with high level of curiosity. You find a path different from the one which everyone follows. The path found by yourself can take you to places which can chane the worlds way.

  • Thoughty experts. Great content. Thanks for sharing. An observation that you might want to look into. The map of India shows partial Kashmir. Kindly improvise if possible as the map seems incomplete without parts of Kashmir in dispute which has always been Indian territory. Many thanks.

  • some people just have a very logical mindset that makes zero sense to others, and it truly does feel magical to experience it in person

  • i feel like he wouldent be this good at math if education was just handed to him that easy having to understand all this advanced equestions from such young age is what made him this smart

  • I love the story and I like the way you presented it. But sir I have a concern. Either you don't show the map or if you have to show then please use the correct map. Either use map of the time which is related to the story or use current time map. Jammu & Kashmir is part of India, but in your video Jammu & Kashmir is not shown in Indian map. Please check that.

  • Fascinating guy.. Thanks for sharing his story!

  • Wow, very fascinating and still tragic. One would argue that he is the greatest mathematical mind ever being that he basically taught himself math so advanced that it is still be deciphered.

  • You know when I was younger Id always think to myself "somewhere in the world there mustve been a person thats 10x better than messi or ronaldo or maradonna or pele in football. But they were too poor or went unrecognized or died too young and therefore the world couldnt have been exposed to their genius. I think this is exactly such a story. Except he got recognized but passed v v early. :/

  • I don’t know why, but for some reason I find this story incredibly moving. Perhaps because it makes me wonder how many other geniuses (in all fields, not just maths) are out there now living in poverty; unrecognised, unflourishing, their fruits or potential gifts lost to us. And how many other geniuses have been lost to us in the past... That being said - considering the stultifying nature of many standard school curricula across the world, perhaps lack of conventional schooling itself was a reason for his genius. Maybe a conventional education would have broken or shackled him. Which is also an indictment of our current system.

    • @Vijay Iyer Having had a brush with US universities I can somewhat see where you get your idea that education is merely conditioning into conventional subjects and thinking. But in most countries, education after high school is all about making you think and discover for yourself(which is quite painful for many people) and teschung you the nevessity of setting out your sources, your methods and your reasoning or analysis. Making you back up the logic of your analysis. Autodidacts - and I was one until my late 20s - tend to operate very much like someone leaping instinctively from stone to stone over a rushing river. And the of discovery or seeing something for the first time can be such a heady rush that you are really reluctant to question that discovery. Usually people without a formal education can’t look back and see how they got “here” from there across the river, so to speak. But they still expect that their view or argument (that is, their hunch or opinion) should be accepted. And asking them to account for what led them to that, they will often take as a personal challenge or insult. Frequently they fundamentally fail to understand what research, or scientific method, even is. A very common thing people do is (without realising it) use unfalsifiable methods or arguments. Education actually comes from a Latin word meaning “to lead out”. Not lead in. Or fill up. It is frustrating that everything done even in undergraduate study in the US, seems to be framed so as to make it testable with multiple choice tests, as if adults are middle schoolers. And if it isn’t testable, the pressure is on teachers to not waste time on it. In this way the is taken out of “education”.

    • @Eh… if he had been given a ''proper education'', he would have been conditioned into conventional thinking and subjects. The fact that he left school early freed his mind in my opinion to pursue subjects he was really passionate about.

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

  • The video is very nicely put and is really informative. But I request you to please show the full map of India at 4:19 The map displayed is missing an entire state.

  • In 1987 his wife was interviewed, and we got a lot of insights about the last 1 year of his life. She told that he used to spend all his time in writing equations, he even didn't want to eat, just write equations. It's as if he knew he was going to die soon and didn't want to deprive humanity of his work. All the work he did in his last year were just loose sheets filled with 100's of equations. But his works were lost and only discovered 40 years after his death. Now called the "The Lost Notebook", the discovery of this book caused as much stir in the mathematical world as the discovery of Beethoven’s tenth symphony would cause in the musical world! Ramanujan wife's interview : id-tv.org/tv/video-1qaRtMjTD-k.html Ramanujan's Lost Notebook : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramanujan%27s_lost_notebook

  • Just imagine what he could've achieved if he had live longer.

  • I propose... where many may ask "What if he were given access to a mathematic education at an early age?", it was most likely his thirsty quest for said knowledge, COMBINED with the freedom to think, which produced these equations. I fear more formal guidance may have left us without his discoveries.

  • Arran, You have this nack of turning even the most obscure of topics and biographies into fascinating viewing. Your enthusiasm is contagious and I always end up smiling back at you - and winking back (I said winking!) with a “You’re welcome” Keep the great work coming. You are a true gem.

    • Once an interviewer asked to gh hardy how would u rate urself,einstien,ramanujan out of 100,this is the real answer hardy gave,i will give myself 37/100,einstien 66/100 nd ramanujan 97/100. Ramanujan's than written theories r helping scientists now in the study of black holes,ramanujan said godess saraswasti comes in my dreams nd gives me all these equations,nd infact many scientists hav speculated there is a dimension greater than ours where all the mystries of universe r answered,its often called as akashic records(akash in hindi means sky),if we consider einstein as principal of best school of knowledge in the world thn ramanujan would be the head of the board of education of the world,we indians were never good at marketing our things,thts y evrything got stolen from here by westrn countries nd sold by labeling there names,from surgery to invention of 0,from shampos to agriculture to drainage systms nd what not,we indians had knowledge of the motions of planets nd stars 1000s of years before any westrn scientists,nd there r proofs of this in our culture,traditions,engravings on our temples,the invention of atom bomb was inspired from geeta,hindus holy book,there is an interview by eisenhower giving credit of his invention to our geeta,mark zuckerburg,steve jobs came to a temple in the north of india during there worst days,nd followed the path tht poojari(priest)suggested thm,just search gadhchiroli baba nd steve jobs or zuckerberg story,u will undrstand,we r the worlds oldest surviving civilization,we know alot of things tht world dont,from past 1200 years we were ruled by some shitty people who just looted our country,1st there were mughals,thy broke our temples,killed our people,converted thm to islam,thn britishers came,india financed ww1 nd ww2 for the britishers,if u want to know more about tht,just search shashi tharoor oxford speech on what britishers took from india,but now finally we got a leader like modiji,who is not only motivating us but also reminding us of glories nd achivmnts of hinduism in the past,thts y now a days u see all this things about india is coming out nd everybody is surprised by this,india is not developing,it is reglcapturing what had been looted from us in the name of secularism.

    • Kinda homophobic but okay

    • Theres a film on it, so its not that obscure

    • The contributions of this genius is everything but obscure. Even in a 100 years we will still be applying his formulas to new problems that come up. In fact we will be using his contribution to understand the universe for hundreds of years.

  • Reminds me of this great quote from the movie Rattatouille, "Not everyone can become a great artist, but a great artist can come from anywhere." - Food critic Anton Ego.

  • He had almost no formal math education, and I still struggle doing some simple partial fraction expansion to solve simple inverse Laplace transform to solve an under-dampened 2nd order LIT system. It's disheartening.

  • When I heard he lost his scholarship for failing the other easy courses I wanted to yell at him through the screen. It's like watching a man who can jump across space get stuck because he decided to stop and stubbed his toe on a formality

  • I stand in awe of this great human being who was so incredibly gifted.

  • Imagine a guy that started from Paleolithic age to 30th century math in shorter than 20 years. His rediscovery of Newton math took him like a week or two. This is like superhero fiction level brain.

    • @mtarkes are you Indian?

    • @Omer YOLAL You are welcome (Y)

    • @Praveen Vasistha dude, thanks so much. with your recommendation i just finished the movie. it was great.

    • There is a movie on him called " A Man who knew Infinity" available on ID-tv :)

  • Ramanujan's story is just amazing and sad at end at the same time I wish he lived more longer

  • Thank goodness for ID-tv. He is well known in india as a brilliant mathematician. I had read about him in textbooks. But hadn’t known how special his genius was until recently.

  • I love and appreciate each and every effort of yours to make this video about a true legend of my country but i think you need to know a bit more about the geographical territories (specially about jammu and kashmir in your map) and a little bit of non biased history about this country. Afterall Lots of love ....

  • As to his being a clerk, well, Einstein found himself in similar position, for similar reasons -- little interest in things outside the prime region of his genius level of interests, hence not following the more mundane pathway of demonstrating proficiency and talent.

  • Imagine finding a new mathematical genius working as something like a janitor, perhaps with a troubled past. It's why I think we should treat everyone with good will, hunting for the next maths prodigy could benefit all of us.

    • .

    • you don't need to believe that a janitor could be a mathematical genius to treat him well, you just fucking treat him well even if there's no possibility of him being a genius

    • You have it backwards. It wasn't Hardy who discovered Ramanujan, it was Ramanujan who discovered and reached out to Hardy. Hardy was just the guy who humoured him long enough to see that he wasn't a flake.

    • Strangely enough, James Croll came up with an astronomical theory of climate change, which eventually led to Milankovitch's cycles, while working as a janitor at Anderson's College in Glasgow some 50 years earlier.

  • As it turns out, the true lesson was found in the mathematical equations solved along the way.

  • There's a saying that goes "truth shall prevail" For Dr Sri, he found the truth in mathematics and today it prevails. Enjoyed this video thank you.

  • It would have interfered with his genius if you taught him at a younger age. Consider the book that he studied -- math with no explained theories to essentially create a maze of walls for his mind towards other insights. He didn't have anything to tell him "this equation is only used in descriptions of light" the other "only in descriptions of sound" yet another "only in descriptions of solid materials" etc... rather he had to try to find connections between all of them completely on his own and probably was attempting to cross utilize the maths he was learning. A constant struggle with something difficult, with a much larger pattern of use beyond your current understanding, sharpens your mind at least in that problem set. We know from Psychology with regards to studying problem solving --> we know it does not increase IQ, but it does make you better at solving whatever specific problem you are practicing solving. I wonder if this discussion might create an insight into how to expand IQ. If you want to be able to open peoples' minds more universally then what needs to be taught more is (and I'm not sure how to..?) is how to not allow presumptions and other people's use-cases and thoughts to steer or block in your assumptions and expansions of thought. Kind of like a detective in a murder story, thinking outside of the box. However even more so... When you take for example, Einstein's theorems and try to impart new things based on his theorems what have you done? You have generated a new idea within the walls and patterns of his logic. That's fine and dandy, and can be extremely useful. (indeed, that is a valid use of a theory) However, outside of that context of utilizing his pre-existing work, is the individual preventing themself from coming up with another advanced idea? What percentage of us are working on possible ideas outside of existing forms of thought? Shouldn't a portion of our high IQ individuals be encouraged (supported, paid research, whatever you want to call it) to explore outside of our existing boxes? Is there a discipline that allows you to "switch" between the two types of thought? I don't believe so, I think it's more a function of IQ and/or constant practice toggling back and forth. I believe you tend to think the way you are trained to think. How was this guy "trained" to think? Probably with very basic broad math concepts. This is not saying I think Einstein was "wrong" it's just saying there could be other ways to quantify/describe the same thing he did. Which new way might then be considered more applicable and/or usable in other contexts as you study them over time. (or even, gasp, disprove one of Einstein's theories in some way...) Remember Einstein himself said imagination was more important. (but certainly rigorous exactness is required) For all we know a given theory might be more of a generalization, "in general E=mc^2" and there might be be a more exact or more applicable use with another formula under other circumstances. Consider "The sky is blue" which works until a given set of circumstances comes into play. In Computer Science you see this constantly. While designing and writing code, the programmer doesn't need the exact formula all the time, just something that gets the job done this time. (this at least partly responsible for the old argument -- is programming a science or an art... I lean more towards Art in this argument...)

  • WHAT A STORY! WOW! THANK YOU SIR!!! And Thank you Mr. RAMANUJAN 🙏🙏🙏

  • I first came across Ramanujan's story in a physics book by Michio Kaku back in the 90s. I was dumbfounded by his story and how utterly talented he was in Math. Later i tried to study his Modular Functions..and as Hardy once said about him..it "defeated me completely".

    • @L. H. Évariste Galois 25

    • @GOD its not spamming,i have learned somewhere,wherever nd whenevr u get the chance just speak the truth,or the people with propoganda will start there lies,nd u r smart enough i think to know wht damage propoganda does to the society

    • @rahul sharma You're literally spamming the same stuff everywhere

    • Once an interviewer asked to gh hardy how would u rate urself,einstien,ramanujan out of 100,this is the real answer hardy gave,i will give myself 37/100,einstien 66/100 nd ramanujan 97/100. Ramanujan's than written theories r helping scientists now in the study of black holes,ramanujan said godess saraswasti comes in my dreams nd gives me all these equations,nd infact many scientists hav speculated there is a dimension greater than ours where all the mystries of universe r answered,its often called as akashic records(akash in hindi means sky),if we consider einstein as principal of best school of knowledge in the world thn ramanujan would be the head of the board of education of the world,we indians were never good at marketing our things,thts y evrything got stolen from here by westrn countries nd sold by labeling there names,from surgery to invention of 0,from shampos to agriculture to drainage systms nd what not,we indians had knowledge of the motions of planets nd stars 1000s of years before any westrn scientists,nd there r proofs of this in our culture,traditions,engravings on our temples,the invention of atom bomb was inspired from geeta,hindus holy book,there is an interview by eisenhower giving credit of his invention to our geeta,mark zuckerburg,steve jobs came to a temple in the north of india during there worst days,nd followed the path tht poojari(priest)suggested thm,just search gadhchiroli baba nd steve jobs or zuckerberg story,u will undrstand,we r the worlds oldest surviving civilization,we know alot of things tht world dont,from past 1200 years we were ruled by some shitty people who just looted our country,1st there were mughals,thy broke our temples,killed our people,converted thm to islam,thn britishers came,india financed ww1 nd ww2 for the britishers,if u want to know more about tht,just search shashi tharoor oxford speech on what britishers took from india,but now finally we got a leader like modiji,who is not only motivating us but also reminding us of glories nd achivmnts of hinduism in the past,thts y now a days u see all this things about india is coming out nd everybody is surprised by this,india is not developing,it is reglcapturing what had been looted from us in the name of secularism.

    • Sad to think of how much more he could have created if had lived until 70 or 80... Like with Niels Henrik Abel, who died at 27 only, and Mozart (35), with his more than 600 works. Another 600 Mozart masterpieces... what a dream!

  • This was a great video. of 1 man, building his own wall. a genius who earned his way up. Sad he didn't live longer.

  • Appreciate your effort to bring this genius world for wider audience in this part of the world